21-Day Decluttering Challenge

21-day decluttering challenge

As a practicing minimalist you wouldn’t think that I’d need a decluttering challenge, but I do. I accumulate stuff just like Every. One. Else.

So let’s debunk a fallacy right now: Decluttering is not something you do once. It’s something you do again and again each year.  Because…

…people give you things you don’t always use.

…and you buy things you think you’ll need but then never end up using.

…and your life changes, including your interests and needs and the size of your waistline.

All of these things make decluttering an ongoing pursuit, and I’m overdue for a pass through my possessions.

My primary motivation for decluttering is always the same: To create space for new things to grow in my life.

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I’d love you to join me. What new things would you like to create space for? A new relationship? A new hobby? A new business? A new healthy way of living?

Let’s not make the common mistake of trying to cram this new thing into our current life and space. Our clutter, unfinished projects, unsightly junk, and neglected objects are weighing us down—stealing precious energy from something new we’re trying to grow.

So let’s create some breathing room, K?

Join me on a 21-day decluttering challenge:

  1. Every day, for 21 days, find 10 objects to get rid of.
  2. These objects can be physical or digital (though I recommend that you stick to physical as much as possible because they offer a better psychological bang for your buck.).
  3. Get rid of them. (This step is obvious but for real–how many times have you created a donate pile and then let it sit in your closet, car or entryway for months?)

Easy, right? I’ll be sharing what I’m getting rid of, plus a couple things that I’ve found to be helpful with decluttering along the way, so follow my progress, and share your own, on Instagram.

Ready? Go.

A month of mini fresh starts

[NOTE: keep scrolling to see the full list of mini fresh start articles below]

I think it was the cadre of sketchy leftovers in my fridge, plus the sticky dark slurry pooling beneath the vegetable crisper, that officially triggered the “oh man, I’ve really got to get myself back together,” sentiments that I’m feeling today.

In other words, it’s time for a fresh start. Or, in my case, it’s time for a month of mini fresh starts. Here’s a list of 30 things I’d like to try in the next 30 days to give this upcoming new year a simple living, fresh-start feeling.

Join me! Follow along on Instagram as I share more details about these simple living fresh start ideas, plus share your own experiences with January, dealing with long winter days, and how you’re keeping things simple as you start off a new year.

a month of mini fresh starts

1. Clean the fridge
2. Give your skin a break and go bare-faced
3. Try hot salad
4. Find a south-facing window and soak up the sunshine
5. Get outside
6. Take a 60-second clutter-busting pass through the room
7. Try a convertible garment
8. Update a corner in your home
9. Replace a disposable with something reuseable
10. Clean an overlooked space
11. Light a candle
12. Eat a fancy dinner at home
13. Get a plant
14. Drink a new hot drink
15. Bake a cake
16. Try/learn something new
17. Unsweeten something you normally sweeten
18. Remove a chemical from your beauty or cleaning routine
19. Replace a synthetic with something natural
20. Play a game
21. Give a gift for no reason
22. Write a note to someone
23. Power down your screens
24. Take a spending break
25. Go to bed early
26. Make bedtime luxurious
27. Leave something undone
28. Leave something empty
29. Have a “nowhere to go” day
30. Make something smell good

Read more mini fresh start articles:

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Calling for Swiss Army Knife stuff

swiss army knife

I have a garment that I can wear eight different ways. I call it the “Swiss Army knife” of my wardrobe. Likewise, I think of coconut oil as the Swiss Army knife of my pantry because I use it for so many food and personal care recipes. And I just read a blog post that talked about the remarkable usefulness of nut bags, and I’m thinking the bags, too, may be in the Swiss Army knife family of versatility.

I’m searching for more Swiss Army knife stuff. Will you help me?

Many of the things I own perform exactly one function. A hair brush. A Kindle. My Doxie paper scanner. They do their specialized job efficiently, and I look for the best quality I can afford when I shop for them.

But then there’s this whole other category of things that I call “Swiss Army knife things.” I get enthusiastic about them because—like their namesake—they do many jobs at once. The video, below, is an example of what I’m talking about. In it, Graham Hill basically creates a plan for a Swiss Army Knife apartment (think Transformers meets Ikea.):

Cool, right? These multitasking gadgets, tools, design concepts, furniture, personal care products, and the like are everywhere. Let’s talk more about these, so if you see something with Swiss Army Knife character, send it my way.